Pigment Epithelial Detachment

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Retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) are structural splitting within the inner aspect of Bruch’s membrane separating the RPE from the remaining Bruch’s membrane.

Disease Entity

Disease

Retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) are characterized by separation between the RPE and the inner most aspect of Bruch's membrane. The space created by this separation is occupied by blood, serous exudate, drusenoid material, or fibrovascular tissue.

Etiology

PEDs are present in chorioretinal diseases such as polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

Risk Factors

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General Pathology

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Pathophysiology

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Primary prevention

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Diagnosis

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History

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Physical examination

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Signs

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Symptoms

Primary symptoms include: blurred vision and partial vision loss, which makes it seem as if a curtain has been pulled across your field of vision, with a dark shadowing effect. There's no pain associated with Retinal Epithelial Detachment.

Clinical diagnosis

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Diagnostic procedures

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Laboratory test

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Differential diagnosis

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Management

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General treatment

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Medical therapy

Several strategies have being used to treat vascularized PEDs, including laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy (PDT), intravitreal steroids and anti-VEGF therapy.

Medical follow up

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Surgery

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Surgical follow up

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Complications

Retinal Pigment Epithelial Tears and Hemorrhage


Prognosis

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Additional Resources

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References

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